Jack Port – From D-Day (June 7, 1944) to VE-Day (May 8, 1945)

The German Army signed the surrender document on May 7, 1945; however, May 8, is commemorated as VE-Day (Victory in Europe). Within those eleven months, Jack underwent some 190 days of combat. An American World War II Division was comprised of 15,000 soldiers and the 4th Division had a (not uncommon) replacement rate of two hundred percent. That equates to 30,000 casualties (Killed, Missing, and Wounded).  It is a miracle that Jack survived.

We can never thank Jack and all his fellow Heroes of Freedom enough for the sacrifices they made for all of us!

When the surrender was signed, Jack was in the German town of Bad Tölz, which is about 25 miles south of Munich.  My friend, Eric Zelt, said that the SS had a regional HQ there.  I was there on July 7, 2013

When the surrender was signed, Jack was in the German town of Bad Tölz, which is about twenty-five miles south of Munich. My friend, Eric Zelt, said the SS had a regional HQ there. I was there on July 7, 2013.

Very near Bad Tölz is the British, Durnback War Cemetery.  The Heroes of Freedom that are buried here were all RAF Airmen from 1939 to 1945. For me it was a stark reminder of how the British stood alone against Germany for three and a half years before America came into the war.

Very near Bad Tölz is the British, Durnback War Cemetery. The Heroes of Freedom that are buried here were all RAF Airmen from 1939 to 1945. It was a stark reminder of how the British stood alone against Germany for three and a half years before America entered the war.

 

 

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About Jeff Lowdermilk

I have traveled to Europe several times over the last few years to follow my grandfather's path as detailed in his World War I diary. My grandfather was an American Infantryman who survived the war. This has been an adventurous journey of self-exploration. The friends I have made along the way and experiences gained have greatly enriched my life

One thought on “Jack Port – From D-Day (June 7, 1944) to VE-Day (May 8, 1945)

  1. Quiles Michel

    C’est très bien ce que tu fais Jeff.
    J’attends encore de tes nouvelles.
    Thank you.
    Michel.

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