General Erwin Rommel, Herrlingen, Germany – July 8, 2013

To continue the story of the great general and his plans to overthrow Hitler, I visited the Rommel sites in the village of Herrlingen. It was here where he, his wife Lucie-Maria, and son Manfred lived.  Herrlingen is mid-way between Munich and Stuttgart.

If you are looking for the Rommel home, this is a good place to start.

If you are searching for the Rommel home, this is a good place to start.

As it is now a private residence, this is all I could see of the family home.  But, it down this lane where the staff car with two generals from Berlin drove to tell Rommel that he could either have a state trial, which would defame his name or commit suicide and save his family.

As it is now a private residence, this is all I could see of the family home. It was here that he recovered from the strafing attack in Normandy.  By early October 1944 he awaited orders for another command.  But, Hitler had connected the dots of conspiracy to Rommel.  It was down this lane where the staff car with two generals from Berlin drove to tell Rommel that he could either have a state trial, which would defame his name or commit suicide and spare the lives of his wife and son.

Less than two blocks from his home, this is where General Rommel  took the cyanid capsule.

Less than two blocks from his home, this is where General Rommel took the cyanid capsule on October 14, 1944. He was a man of honor.

General Rommel and his wife are in the church cemetery in Herrlingen.

General Rommel and his wife (d.1971) were buried in the Herrlingen church cemetery.

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About Jeff Lowdermilk

I have traveled to Europe several times over the last few years to follow my grandfather's path as detailed in his World War I diary. My grandfather was an American Infantryman who survived the war. This has been an adventurous journey of self-exploration. The friends I have made along the way and experiences gained have greatly enriched my life

One thought on “General Erwin Rommel, Herrlingen, Germany – July 8, 2013

  1. Melinda

    I lived in the home directly behind Rommel’s in 1969-1970. At that time his home had been turned into a kindergarten, as I remember. His backyard was much more extensive than ours and it seemed rather idyllic. It was hard to imagine his forced suicide there as it felt so tranquil, peaceful.

    Across the street, well the side street, was a pretty little Church with well kept grounds. While I would take my baby for long walks everyday there, I never saw any sign of activity or life there, but it seemed so inviting while paradoxically being so empty. This was not the Church grounds where Rommel was buried, but I would walk downtown past the little stream to the village cemetery and visit that grave occasionally. Then as now, it was good to know the Desert Fox not only saw the light, but had the courage to act on it.

    Thanks for the update!

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